National Child Day 2020 Advancing children’s rights. If not now, when?

By Beth Williams, Our Kids Network Communications Manager

“The 21st Century will belong to our children and our children’s children. It is their dreams and aspirations, shaped by the circumstances into which they are born and which surround them as they grow up, that will give this century its final definition. Those who are under 18 today constitute more than a third of the world’s population and are already profoundly affecting our lives by their decisions and actions. For their sake as well as our own, we must do everything possible to reduce the suffering that weighs them down, open up their opportunities for success and ensure them a culture of respect.”

Senator Landon Pearson, National Early Years Conference, March 2007

Senator Pearson’s words resonate even more deeply today than they did 13 years ago. The children and youth of Halton are sharing the pandemic experience with the children of the world. Reducing their suffering and threats, creating opportunities for them, helping them build resilience, and most of all, creating a culture of support and respect are paramount. There has never been a better time to advance the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) and the Canadian Children’s Charter of Rights than on this year’s National Child Day, Friday, November 20.

The Canadian version of the UN Declaration of the Rights of the Child was created in 2018

Cover of Canadian Children's Charter PDF
Click to download the Charter.

Developed by Children First Canada with the active participation of thousands of Canadian children and youth, the The Canadian Children’s Charter: A Call to Action to Respect, Protect and Fulfil the Rights of Canada’s Children came to be through a broad consultation process that included government, the private sector, and community leaders. The final version was released on National Child Day in November 2018, and received support from Prime Minister Trudeau and other parliamentarians, business leaders, and those serving and supporting children, youth and families.

Why are National Child Day and a Canadian Children’s Charter of Rights important?

The more children know and understand their rights, the more empowered they become. National Child Day is the perfect time to open the conversation and teach children about their rights. It’s an opportunity to explore the UN Convention for a global perspective and look at the Canadian charter for a national and local view.

A national day to celebrate children reminds us to reflect on and question how we are treating and interacting with children and youth. As adults, we must acknowledge that it is our duty to listen and to act when children express their needs, thoughts, and opinions.

In 2020, we recognize that the world, our countries, and our communities have changed forever. With everything that children have to deal with today, the Canadian Children’s Charter can be another resource to help us understand the challenges they face and create a sense of security and safety for them.

What can you do to take part in National Child Day 2020?

Become familiar with the Canadian Children’s Charter of Rights and the nine calls to action that specifically address the “gap between the promises made to children, and the harsh realities that millions of Canadian children face each day due to poverty, abuse, discrimination, along with threats to physical and emotional health.”  

Know the Canadian laws and policies that protect the rights and safety of children (in addition to the UNCRC, which was ratified in Canada in 1991.)

  • Optional Protocols 1 and 2 (Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict and Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution, and Child Pornography)
  • A Canada Fit for Children: a National Plan of Action
  • Children: the Silenced Citizens, a Report by the Senate Standing Committee on Human Rights  
  • Jordan’s Principle                  
  • House  of Commons All-Party Resolution to End Child Poverty by the Year 2000

Study the research on the status of children in Canada and in Halton. Learn about the inequities and challenges that children in Canada and Halton face today.

Join the online National Child Day 2020 campaign. Use your social media networks and the hashtag #SeenAndHeard to spread the word.

Attend the National Child Day interactive digital event – for children and adults alike – on November 20 at 1 p.m. ET. This year, children and youth from across the country will discuss what it means to be #SeenAndHeard. You’ll also hear from youth activists, Canada’s leading voices for children’s rights, government and industry leaders, and more.

Start conversations about the Canadian Children’s Charter of Rights with the children and youth in your life. Listen closely to their comments and thoughts.

Visit the Halton Youth Initiative website and see how groups of young people are making a difference in Halton by working with adult allies to elevate youth voice, empowering themselves and having a positive impact in the communities of North Oakville, Acton, Aldershot and Milton.

Read the Children First Canada National Child Day blogs to find voices of youth, fast facts about National Child Day, and how partnerships can help support children’s rights.

Now more than ever, the importance of our collective work supporting Halton’s children, youth, and families cannot be underestimated. On National Child Day and every day, we thank you.