Celebrating 30 years of the Convention on the Rights of the Child on November 20

By Mary Tabak, Our Kids Network Developmental Assets Manager

Thirty years ago, many world leaders made a commitment to the world’s children by adopting the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, an international agreement on childhood rights.

Take a moment to review the rights. Are there any surprises? Did you feel that you had these rights when you were young?

Download the child-friendly language poster.

It’s become the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history and has helped transform children’s lives around the world. However, until every child has every right, our work is not done.

November 20th is designated as National Child Day. This day is an opportunity to reflect on how we can advocate for, promote and celebrate children’s rights to make the world a better place for children.

30 Ways to Celebrate and Reflect on Children’s Rights

  1. Discuss the rights with children and youth in your life.
  2. Donate to an organization that works to make the lives of children better.
  3. Donate children’s supplies to a local charity.
  4. Sponsor a child. Foster a child.
  5. Send a child a letter of appreciation. Here’s an example to get you started.
  6. Appreciate all that Canada has to offer children and youth now, and consider the work still to be done.
  7. Introduce a child to something new in their community.
  8. Write a letter to local politicians supporting children’s rights.
  9. Learn about the Indigenous culture and community in Canada.
  10. Send the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child to someone who works with children, and tell them they are doing a great job.
  11. Post the child-friendly version of the rights on your social media channels.
  12. Ask a child how they want to celebrate, then do it.
  13. Do something to make your neighbourhood safer.
  14. Give a young person a job.
  15. Connect youth with their passions.
  16. Ask young people what they think of the rights.
  17. Give parents a break.
  18. Invite your extended family for dinner and discuss the rights.
  19. Discuss the rights at work. Is there anything you can do there?
  20. Use the OKN Data Portal 2.0 for a deeper understanding of the status of children and youth in Halton.

And 10 more…put the Developmental Relationships Framework into practice to demonstrate children’s rights.

  1. Express Care. Show me that I matter to you.
  2. Provide Support. Help me complete task and achieve goals.
  3. Share Power. Treat me with respect and give me a say.
  4. Expand Possibilities. Connect me with people and places that broaden my world.
  5. Be Dependable. Be someone I can trust.
  6. Listen. Really pay attention when we are together.
  7. Navigate. Guide me through hard situations and systems.
  8. Empower. Build my confidence to take charge of my life.
  9. Advocate. Stand up for me when I need it.
  10. Inspire. Inspire me to see possibilities for my future.

All kids are our kids. Let’s keep working together to make this world a better place for children and youth.

We Have A Voice

National Child Day is celebrated in Canada on November 20th in recognition of our country’s commitment to upholding the rights of children and two historic events: the 1959 signing of the UN Declaration of the Rights of the Child and the adoption of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1989.

For more information about The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child visit https://www.unicef.org/child-rights-convention