Acton Early Years Committee: “The Heart of the Matter”

By Alison Hilborn, Our Kids Network Acton Community Hub Coordinator

Around the Acton Early Years Committee table, making a positive difference in children’s lives is what we all want.  We want young children in Acton to grow and flourish, and ultimately become successful, happy adults.  We work towards this vision through the many strong partnerships around the table. Over the past four years we’ve met once a month. We’ve brainstormed, discussed, critically analyzed, grown closer, and developed supportive, mindful relationships – relationships with “heart”.

It’s important to recognize that the partners on this committee come from organizations that have their own mandates, and yet these organizations all see the tremendous value in working together to bring change for the good to the community, and to young children and their families. We’re grateful for these Halton organizations* that support their staff to participate at the Acton Early Years Committee table. The benefits from their knowledge, expertise and perspectives on child development and this community’s unique needs are invaluable. We’ve progressed from speculating on possible solutions to grounding our discussions and actions in experiential learning, best practice efforts, and strategies.

It’s easy to see how our evidence-based initiatives that support young Acton children reflect the heart and creativity of the Acton Early Years Committee:

  • Fine and gross motor skill activity kits that respond directly to the Early Development Initiative (EDI) vulnerabilities.
  • Annual Kindergarten Fun Fairs to engage with new parents and to provide necessary service support information.
  • Connect, Play & Learn Every Day! Messaging that speaks directly to parents.

We know it will take more time, and lots of hard work, to improve on current EDI results, but the Acton Early Years Committee is dedicated!  We will use our partnerships, what we’ve learned, and our “heart” to continue to work toward addressing the underlying factors that impact young children’s developmental readiness for school – and to ensure that, in Acton, all children thrive!

Approximately 280 people attended the 2018 Acton Kindergarten Fun Fair including 89 brand, new kindergarten children!

 

*Acton Early Years Committee

Halton Catholic District School Board

St. Joseph’s Catholic Elementary School

Halton District School Board

McKenzie-Smith Bennet School

Robert Little Public School

Halton Region, Children’s Services and Healthy Families

The Halton Resource Centre

Reach Out Centre for Kids ROCK

The Town of Halton Hills

Community Living North Halton,

YMCA of the GTA

Links2Care – EarlyON

Halton Hills Libraries

Halton Children’s Aid Society

Spirit of Partnership Thrives at the OKN Milton Hub

By Our Kids Network Milton Hub Coordinator

 

Wonderful community partners have made the Milton Hub the success that it is today.

Partnerships are what make our outreach into the community work. The Milton Hub’s partners come from the social service sector, not-for-profit sector, the faith community, the Town of Milton, the Halton District School Board and the Halton Catholic District School Board. This amazing team of partners all share a strong interest in supporting the community and working together to better serve the children and families of Milton. This shared focus is what makes us a “backbone” community table.

Our team of Hub partners meet often to discuss programs that they themselves are running in support of the community, or to learn about programs run by other service providers. This way everyone is knowledgeable about all programs taking place in the community, so partners can better serve their cliental and avoid duplication.

A key aspect of our meetings is the resilient connections forged between agencies and partners that lead to further partnerships and potential programs. Our Kids Network and Halton agencies and organizations are unique in that a majority of agencies serving the community are so very willing to work together to identify issues. They plan and develop programs and then deliver them in unity. They are dedicated to working together rather than in their own individual funding silos. This makes for a better community for everyone – but most of all for our children, youth and families.

 

Crosstowne Community Church Building on Caring for the Milton Community

One of the Hub’s community partners is Crosstowne Community Church – a strong partner for many years. Each August, the Hub hosts a Backpack and Community BBQ program with Crosstowne, and this past August, we provided over fifty backpacks to children in need.

We’re excited about this November 10, when the Milton Hub will again host a winter clothing pop-up shop and coat drive in partnership with Crosstowne Church at “The Corner”, 100 Nipissing Rd., Unit 3. The focus of the pop-up and coat drive is newcomers to Milton and Canada, and community members accessing mental health support.

Image if kids enjoying winter

In the past two years, while the church organized the event, the Hub contributed its extensive community contact list to help spread the word and ensure the Hub team partner agencies let their clients know about the pop-up shop. As well, Hub partners, such as schools, helped acquire donations.

Last year’s events were well attended and many people in Milton were able to have and enjoy winter clothing that they are not able to afford.

This is only one wonderful example of the spirit of partnership at work in Milton!!Milton Hub Winter Clothing Pop up flyer

 

Back to School Weather Report

By Nikki Taylor, Senior Manager, Early Years and Family Supports,                Oakville Parent-Child Centre

“I’ve come to a frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It’s my personal approach that creates the climate. It’s my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child’s life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child humanized or dehumanized.”

These powerful words from psychologist, teacher and author, Dr. Hiam Ginott are worthy of reflection as our children, teachers and parents head back to the school routine. While Dr. Ginott is referencing the role of teachers, I believe it is equally appropriate for anyone who has the privilege of influencing the growth and development of our children.

I was reminded of this quote after spending some time with my 7 and 10 year-old grandchildren recently. We chatted for a while and finally came around to the “getting-ready-for-school” conversation. The 7 year-old was nervously anticipating the first day as many children do, not yet knowing who her teacher or classmates would be. My oldest granddaughter explained excitedly that her teacher was new to the school, but as it turned, out she had made an assumption. Later in the day, we ran into a friend who explained that this teacher had married over the summer. She was not new to the school. I was taken aback by the instant change in my granddaughter’s demeanor – from excited and happy to quiet and thoughtful. When we were alone, I asked her about the change in her behaviour. She explained that this teacher was well known for raising her voice often. As a sensitive and empathetic child, this creates a distressing climate for my granddaughter, and she was worried. To protect her heart, I told her that when an adult behaves badly, it’s not about the children, but about the adult.

I’ m not here to judge nor condemn educators or parents. I am both, and have certainly raised my voice from time to time. We are all human after all. However, as I reflect on my own behaviour, I realize that outbursts are not a conscious choice and have little or nothing to do with others, and are more about inner feelings. Stress, in particular, hijacks our logical brain, impulse control, and self-regulation skills; leaving us under the power of our emotional brain. Did you know that children often misinterpret expressions of stress on adult faces, as anger? I can’t help but wonder what children see and how they feel as they look to each of us for understanding, support, patience, and care given the levels of stress many of us live with.

When we take care of ourselves, we are better able to care for others. What if we worked harder to create a climate for ourselves, each other, and for children, that allows us to feel secure, respected, safe and loved, rather than criticized, judged and overworked?

Caring teachers and family

 

I hope that this short reflection will help us, as adults raising and working with children, to create a climate of acceptance, tolerance and trust for children and youth to thrive.

How About Work Relationships?

By Mary Tabak, Our Kids Network Developmental Assets Manager

With our hectic work schedules through the year, the slower summer months can be a great time to organize, plan and prepare, and get to those little “side of your desk” projects.

Can it also be a time to think about building better work relationships?  We know that strong work relationships are integral to meeting objectives and can greatly contribute to job satisfaction. Our Kids Network (OKN) knows that when professionals work as supportive team members, it has positive impacts on kids because we all bring our strengths to the table in the spirit of collaboration and positive relationships.

Here are few quick wins that can help you develop strong work relationships:

Be in touch

Via phone; email; coffee breaks, lunches; a few minutes before and after meetings.  Take the time to stay connected.

Be authentic

Just be yourself.

Be a giver and a receiver

Great relationships are a two-way street.

Be generous in lending a hand to help others meet their goals; and don’t be afraid to be open to others helping you, too.

Build mutual respect

Respond in a timely manner; follow through with tasks; arrive for meetings on time; put phones away when others are speaking; listen carefully; be open to learning.

Identify shared goals and values

Start with the Halton 7 to help you with common goals.

Have fun!

Use humour as appropriate; celebrate a job well done; give positive feedback regularly.

A team shares a laugh

Groups collaborating and sharing

Groups shared laughs and ideas at the 2017 OKN Asset-Building Forum.

 

Building strong work relationships doesn’t have to be complicated. Let’s create a professional environment in Halton where strong relationships are the norm – yes, with children, youth and families – but also with each other too!

 

 

Parenting Report Card: What Grades Would Our Kids Give Us?

By Mary Tabak, Our Kids Network Developmental Assets Project Manager

‘Tis the season…of yummy barbeques; long sunny walks; flower gardens; good books; picnics; and…report cards?  Yikes!  School is coming to a close and the summer is just about to start – but not until the report cards come home.

Thinking about report cards makes me wonder – what grades would our kids give us?

Let’s consider the following:

  • Have we used our Language to choose our words with kindness and care?
  • Has learning Another Language helped us be more inclusive of other cultures?
  • Has History taught us not to repeat things that don’t work?
  • Is Science helping us make better choices about our health?
  • Does Geography make it difficult for us to see each other and spend quality time together? How do we stay connected?
  • Are we using Math to count minutes instead of make memorable moments?
  • Are Music, Fitness and Art helping us to connect, learn and play together?
  • Can Computer Science teach us how to turn it off?
  • Has Psychology reduced our stress and increased our happiness?

Take the summer to improve your grades! Reconnect and reset with your family – it’s never too late to focus on what’s really important in life.

For ideas and inspiration on building relationships and connecting visit Developmental Relationships and Family Assets.