We can Count on Each Other in 2019!

Worth repeating…

This blog was distributed as the year-end message to our network in December. We can’t say thanks enough so here it is again for anyone who missed it in their inbox!

By Beth Williams, Our Kids Network Communications Manager

Our Kids Network people are creating a hopeful future for Halton children and youth. In 2018 we saw steady progress and it’s clear in our many initiatives and activities that, as a network, we are more connected and aligned in our work. We are intentional when putting knowledge into practice, and we are seeing the results in our data, planning and action going forward.

Thank you for your contributions throughout 2018. As Our Kids Network, we have much to be proud of and we can count on each other continue to be as involved and committed in 2019 as we were in 2018!

2018 Highlights: Our Kids Network’s Committees and Community-based Groups

Acton Early Years 4th Annual Kindergarten Fun Fair at Prospect Park on Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Relationships Help Us Sink or Swim! Eastview PS student video on how relationships with family, friends and peers make a difference in their lives.

Data is Delicious! Rudy the turnip explains why it’s so important for community members to do surveys so children, youth and families can thrive.

Kids are Excited to Start School and to Connect, Play and Learn, Every Day! 1300 activity bags were given to new students at kindergarten and community events.

2015-2016 Tell Them From Me / OurSCHOOL surveys give us important knowledge about the wellbeing of children and youth in Halton. Elementary  Secondary

Youth Voices Matter! The North Oakville Youth Development Council (NOYDC), established by youth and aided by adult allies, engaged the community in creating positive change in the neighbourhood and beyond.

Asset-Builders Tell their Stories. Five Halton asset-builders tell their exceptional stories about what building assets means to them.

Learn much more about Our Kids Network on our website.

Spirit of Partnership Thrives at the OKN Milton Hub

By Our Kids Network Milton Hub Coordinator

 

Wonderful community partners have made the Milton Hub the success that it is today.

Partnerships are what make our outreach into the community work. The Milton Hub’s partners come from the social service sector, not-for-profit sector, the faith community, the Town of Milton, the Halton District School Board and the Halton Catholic District School Board. This amazing team of partners all share a strong interest in supporting the community and working together to better serve the children and families of Milton. This shared focus is what makes us a “backbone” community table.

Our team of Hub partners meet often to discuss programs that they themselves are running in support of the community, or to learn about programs run by other service providers. This way everyone is knowledgeable about all programs taking place in the community, so partners can better serve their cliental and avoid duplication.

A key aspect of our meetings is the resilient connections forged between agencies and partners that lead to further partnerships and potential programs. Our Kids Network and Halton agencies and organizations are unique in that a majority of agencies serving the community are so very willing to work together to identify issues. They plan and develop programs and then deliver them in unity. They are dedicated to working together rather than in their own individual funding silos. This makes for a better community for everyone – but most of all for our children, youth and families.

 

Crosstowne Community Church Building on Caring for the Milton Community

One of the Hub’s community partners is Crosstowne Community Church – a strong partner for many years. Each August, the Hub hosts a Backpack and Community BBQ program with Crosstowne, and this past August, we provided over fifty backpacks to children in need.

We’re excited about this November 10, when the Milton Hub will again host a winter clothing pop-up shop and coat drive in partnership with Crosstowne Church at “The Corner”, 100 Nipissing Rd., Unit 3. The focus of the pop-up and coat drive is newcomers to Milton and Canada, and community members accessing mental health support.

Image if kids enjoying winter

In the past two years, while the church organized the event, the Hub contributed its extensive community contact list to help spread the word and ensure the Hub team partner agencies let their clients know about the pop-up shop. As well, Hub partners, such as schools, helped acquire donations.

Last year’s events were well attended and many people in Milton were able to have and enjoy winter clothing that they are not able to afford.

This is only one wonderful example of the spirit of partnership at work in Milton!!Milton Hub Winter Clothing Pop up flyer

 

How About Work Relationships?

By Mary Tabak, Our Kids Network Developmental Assets Manager

With our hectic work schedules through the year, the slower summer months can be a great time to organize, plan and prepare, and get to those little “side of your desk” projects.

Can it also be a time to think about building better work relationships?  We know that strong work relationships are integral to meeting objectives and can greatly contribute to job satisfaction. Our Kids Network (OKN) knows that when professionals work as supportive team members, it has positive impacts on kids because we all bring our strengths to the table in the spirit of collaboration and positive relationships.

Here are few quick wins that can help you develop strong work relationships:

Be in touch

Via phone; email; coffee breaks, lunches; a few minutes before and after meetings.  Take the time to stay connected.

Be authentic

Just be yourself.

Be a giver and a receiver

Great relationships are a two-way street.

Be generous in lending a hand to help others meet their goals; and don’t be afraid to be open to others helping you, too.

Build mutual respect

Respond in a timely manner; follow through with tasks; arrive for meetings on time; put phones away when others are speaking; listen carefully; be open to learning.

Identify shared goals and values

Start with the Halton 7 to help you with common goals.

Have fun!

Use humour as appropriate; celebrate a job well done; give positive feedback regularly.

A team shares a laugh

Groups collaborating and sharing

Groups shared laughs and ideas at the 2017 OKN Asset-Building Forum.

 

Building strong work relationships doesn’t have to be complicated. Let’s create a professional environment in Halton where strong relationships are the norm – yes, with children, youth and families – but also with each other too!

 

 

Halton Children and Youth Tell Us What’s Important to Them

New Our Kids Network reports give insight into wellbeing of elementary and secondary students

By Dr. Elisabeth Wells, Ph.D., Research and Knowledge Broker

Our Kids Network (OKN) has just released two new reports outlining the results of the 2015-2016 Tell Them From Me (TTFM)/OurSCHOOL surveys of elementary and secondary students across Halton Region.

The results show that connectedness and relationships matter to youth, most students value what they’re learning in school, and cyber bullying is the least common type of bullying among elementary students; at the same time, some students are lacking a sense of belonging at school and many are exceeding the recommendations for daily recreational screen time.

The information in the new reports represents responses from 18,047 students in grades 4 to 6 and 17,481 students in grades 9 to 12. The reports contain information on students’ relationships, school and learning experiences, safety, bullying, and health and wellness. Results are examined by grade and gender. In addition, as a result of the shifting demographic profile of Halton Region and growth in the newcomer population in recent years, the reports also highlight the experiences and wellbeing of immigrant students in Halton.

The survey results provide Halton-specific information, which informs the community, and also to helps professionals and organizations working with children, youth, and families make informed decisions about programs and services.

Talking about the results is the best way to start exploring the data. OKN has been sharing the results with our partners. We are having insightful conversations about what the results mean for Halton and how we can work together to act on the results. See the back page of the reports for ideas on how to do more with data and help children and youth thrive.

The Tell Them From Me (TTFM)/OurSCHOOL survey was developed by the Learning Bar Inc. 2009

The reports are online at http://www.ourkidsnetwork.ca/Public/Our-Research.

Family Day is the Most Important Day of the Year!

By Nikki Taylor, RECE
Senior Manager, Early Years and Family Support
Oakville Parent-Child Centre

Once upon a time there were 52 “family days” in a year.

Imagine…..children, parents, grandparents, friends and family gathered together to share food, play and enjoy each other’s company. There were no agendas, few distractions, no particular place to go, and people were together.

Some of you may remember these days. They were known as Sundays. Yes, for those of you much younger than me; let me explain. Sunday was a day when stores and businesses were closed; many people did not work; technology was just in sci-fi movies; and for that one day –  every week the world slowed enough to allow a focus on family and friends. We created memories, relationships and traditions that became the glue that held us all together. One of my favorite memories of Sundays is the long drives we took with no particular destination. They were always an adventure in the making.

Fast forward and I must say, I find it a bit ironic that we now have a declared a holiday devoted to the most important thing we can do – spend quality, connected time with our loved ones. On the usually frosty February Family Day, we slow down and we give ourselves permission to tune in, focus, put the distractions away – and have a little fun together.

If you think about it, couldn’t every day be a little more like Family Day?

Here are a few simple things that you could try to keep that family day feeling going

  1. Slow down (even just a little). Carl Honore, Canadian journalist and author of In Praise of Slow (Vintage Canada 2009),  speaks persuasively in his TED talk In Praise of Slowness
  2. Share a family meal together as often as you can: Need to know why? Check out the Family Dinner Project for recipes, conversation starters and for you information junkies, lots of research on the benefits.
  3. Believe in the power of relationships. You are your children’s first and most important teacher. Check out Halton’s very own Family Relationships Matter video featuring local families.
  4. The family that plays together stays together. This Psychology Today article by Peter Gray, research professor and author of Free to Learn (Basic Books, 2013), offers 5 important ways to know if it is really play.
  5. Connection is the key. Check out this Zero to Five commentary and learn more about the connect before you direct approach and invite more connection and cooperation from your children.
  6. Empathy goes a long way to bringing us closer to children and adults alike. Brene Brown is a researcher, professor and speaker on topics such as vulnerability, courage, and authenticity. Check out her video for some humorous insight.
  7. Love and parent with authenticity and a soft heart. Learn more from Brene Brown’s Wholehearted Parenting Manifesto.

Your children are miracles, gifted to you for a very short time. Enjoy them, learn from them and hold them dear. Trust and believe in yourselves and each other. You are truly all your children need.

My challenge to you – create as many “family days” in 2018 as you can. What will your “once upon a time” stories be?